The Law Office of Fred M. Mester, P.C.

           Ombudsman for the United States District Court Eastern District of Michigan


Judge Mester served as a Captain in the U.S. Army 3rd Armor Division, 1st Calvary.  After four years of service to his country, Judge Mester attained a BA from Central Michigan University and then a Juris Doctor of Law from Wayne State University.  Judge Mester was admitted to practice in 1967.


Since 1967, Judge Mester has worked as General Counsel for Chrysler Corporation.  He was then appointed to the United States Attorney General's Office where he served with deceased Michigan Supreme Court Justice James H. Brickley and current Federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Ralph P. Guy, Jr.  In 1975, Judge Mester went to work for the Sixth Circuit Court in Oakland County as the Judicial Administrator.  In 1982, Governor William Milliken appointed Fred as a Circuit Court Judge, where he served for 27 years until retiring in 2009.  Judge Mester has also served as a judge on the Michigan Court of Appeals.  In 2014, Chief Judge Gerald E. Rosen of Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, appointed Judge Mester as Ombudsman.   


Over the years, Judge Mester  has handled hundreds, if not thousands, of civil and criminal cases.  His expertise includes mediation, facilitation, case evaluation, arbitration, contract law, civil rights, employment, product liability, family law, and more.

If you have a legal matter that needs resolution, Judge Mester may be able to help.  Contact us for a free consultation.

help IS ON THE way

Arbitration  -  mediation  -  facilitation

Our system of jurisprudence in this country balances on the equitable principles of fairness and justice.  The United States Supreme Court and Michigan Supreme Court both look to those basic human principles  of an ordered society when determining individual rights.


The best way to ensure that the scales of justice evenly balance in any litigation is through the assistance of counsel .  Gideon v. Wainwright, 372 U.S. 335 (1963).